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ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC 

lllil'l '111 

3 1833 02879 0175 



Gc 977.202 B45bhs, 1916 
Berne High School (Berne, 

Ind.) 
B H S Annual 



/ 



B ^ H ^ S 

ANNUAL 

19 16 




May dumber of 'Uhe Budget 



"DEDICATION 



/TO The Berne High School— the institution 
that stands for the disciplining of mind and 
body, for broader visions, for higher ideals, for 
greater enthusiasm to live upright lives, and for gen- 
uineness in all actions— this, the final issue of The 
Budget is affectionately dedicated. 



Allen County Public Library 

900 Webster Street 

PO Box 2270 

Fort Wayne, IN 46801-2270 



SALUTATION 



/Is we lake leave of the institution that has 
y^ given us four years of hard work in mental 
training, WE submit this issue of THE 
BUDGET in the hope that it may in some respect, 
at least, reflect the life of the school and the com- 
bined efforts of the class and staff of Sixteen and 
that it may in years to come recall fond memories 
of the years thus spent. 



The Board of Education 




J. F. LEHMAN 



C. STENGEL 
Secretary 





R. R. SCHUG 
Treasurer 



The Faculty 




ASA SPRUNGER. A. 

Assistant Principal 

Science, Manual Train 



MARTHA BAl'MCARTNKR, A. 
History, English 




Class Colors 

NILE GREEN AND CREAM 



Class Flower 

LILY-OF-THE-VALLEY 



Class Motto 

'LABOR OMNIA VINCIT" 




FRANCES IRENE REUSSER 

"Oh! fie upoi; the single life! Forego it." 

Apha; President IV; Budget Staflf; Vice- 
President of High School IV. 

Frances will soon change her name and 
go to house-keeping. 



CLARENCE HIRSCHY 

"The mould of a man's fortune is in his 
own hands." 

Arena; Class President II; Track III, IV; 
Basket-ball II, III, IV; President Athletic 
Association IV. 

"Abe" intends to go west to seek his 
fortune. 



LORENA SPRUNGER 
"Judge me by what I am and thou shalt 
find me fairest." 

Alpha; Class President I; Alpha Presi- 
dent III; Budget StafT; President Ger- 
man Club. 

"Glory" will take up college work after 
a few years of rest from high school. 



JOE F. HABEGGER 

"Life is too short for mean anxieties." 

Alpha; Editor-in-Chief of Budget; Track 
III, IV; High School Cheer Leader IV; 
Orchestra III, IV; High School Secre- 
tary-Treasurer II; Class Play III. 

Joe will try his skill at pedagogy for a 
year or two, after which he will take up 
college work. 




IRENE STUCKY 

"She has an eye that can speak though her 
tongue were silent." 

Arena; Arena Pianist IV. 

"Sis" will undoubtedly lie found among 
the happy housewives in a few years. 



ERMIN DAVID BIXLER 

"Let the world slide, let the world go; 
A fig for care, a fig for woe." 

Arena; High School President IV; Class 
Reporter III; Budget Staff; Arena Presi- 
dent III; Orchestra IV. 

"Dixie" will follow in the footsteps of 
his father and be a jeweler. 



CORDELIA RIESEN 

"Modest and capable, and with a heart as 
big as all outdoors." 

Arena; Vice-President of Class I; Class 
Secretary III. 

Cordelia will be found in a district 
school next year. 



RUFUS H. BLOWERS 

"I can but think of thy joyous air. 

Thy laughing eyes and thy shining hair." 

Basket-ball III. IV; 



Alpha; Track III, IV 
Budget StafT. 

"Booser'' will take care of the farm 
next year and later he int'.'nds to take up 
college work. 




LESTER SMITH 

"If they had only left poor Adam's ribs 
alone." 

Arena; Basket Ball Team IV; Class Presi- 
dent III: Arena President IV; Track 
Team IV; Orchestra III, IV; Business 
Manager of "The Budget". 



"Schraity" will stay at home 
ready for future life." 



id get 



LEONA SPRUNGER 

"Sat and gazed with those haze! eyes, 
Her mind far ofT in the azure skies." 

Arena; Budget Staff; Vice-President Ger- 
man Club. 

Leona is learning the "house-keeping 
trade". 



DAVID D. BIXLER 

"Honor comes by diligence." 

Alpha; Alpha Secretary IV; Track; Bud- 
get Staff; Class Secretary IV. 

"Davie" will teach at "Dutch College" 
next year. 



CHARLOTTE BARBARA STENGEL 
"As quiet as a mouse 
As yet no trap has caught her." 

Arena. 

"Lottie" will be found among the Hei 
delberg students next year. 




THEODORE ALWIN v. d. SMISSEN 
"My tongue within my mouth I rein, 
Who talks much must talk in vain." 

Alpha; Track Team IV; Orchestra III, IV. 

Alwin will take up a college 
Bluffton next year. 



EDNA D. NEUENSCHWANDER 

'"Tis modesty that makes them seem di 



Arena; Budget Staff; Arena Pianist III. 

Edna will stay at home at present and 
help her mother in managing the home. 



RAYMOND C. WULLIMAN 

" 'Tis the good reader that makes a good 
book." 

Alpha; Class President IV; Track III, IV; 
Basket-ball IV. 

"Woolie" is not fully decided as to the 
future, but undoubtedly will attend some 
institution of advanced learning. 



ILMA E. BAUMGARTNER 

"A heart to resolve, a head to contrive, 
and a hand to execute." 

Arena; Class Reporter IV; Arena Vice- 
President III. 

"Pete" is preparing to be a model house- 
mistress. 




SYBILLA GERTRUDE SPRUNGER 

"So modest; half her worth is not 
known." 

Alpha; Class Secretary-Treasurer I; High 
School Pianist III, IV; Orchestra III, IV. 

Sybilla will be a star at the piano after 
her graduation from the conservatory. 



DANIEL PAUL TEETER 

"Trittary trot, trittary trot, 

The faster he went, the farther he got." 

Ill, IV; Orchestra 



Alpha; Track Te 

IV. 



ill take up "muck farming. 



lABEL HIRSCHY 

"Silence is more eloquent than words." 
Alpha; Class Reporter. 

"Mabelle" will take up the study of 
nursing at Detroit, Mich., next winter. 



CLINTON SOLDNER 

"I know you by the waggling of your 
head." 

Alpha; Class Play III; Basket-ball II, 
III, IV; Budget Staff. 

"Brains" will attend Purdue to study 
scientific farming. 




FLORENCE ELIZABETH LEHMAN 

"Your hero should be tall, you know." 
Arena; Budget Staff. 

"Flossie" will take up Music and Do- 
Science next year. 



PEARL MARGUERITE ATZ 

"It's wiser being good than bad." 
Alpha; Class Secretary II; Budget Staff. 

Pearl will attend Heidelberg University 
next year. 



CLASS SONG OF '16 



When the tie of warm affection 

Stirs the hearts of one and all, 
Sweet the sense of exaltation 

Common vict'ries to recall ; 
Or our thoughts are filled with memories 

Of our common "weal and woe" 
As we stand upon life's threshold 

And to graver duties go. 

Standing on the brink of life, 

We strain our misty eyes to see 
Where the flood of ^mes will bear 

Expectant barqu^and oarsmen free. 
Reverent steals the sense of power 

That must charge the coming years. 
As they bear us swiftly onward. 

Filled with laughter or with tears. 
12 



P. A., '16. 



Senior Class History 



The present Senior class entered the B. H. S. September 9, 1912. with an 
enrolment of thirty-three. Indeed were we verdant "Freshies". but each one 
acknowledged it and strived to attain a higher degree in the future. The 
expression, "all great things have small beginnings", applies very much to 
our class. Our number, we are sorry to state, was lessened before our first 
mile-stone was reached. The members which dropped out were Gertrude 
Kerr, Daniel Graham and Leonard Baumgartner. But. nevertheless, the other 
members went on with more -feest. in order to make up for the removal of the 
above mentioned. 



YEAR 1912-13— FRESHMAN YEAR 

Class Officers 

President - - - - LORENA SPRUNGER 

Vice-President - - - CORDELIA RIESEN 

Secretary-Treasurer - - SYBILLA SPRUNGER 

Pianist ----- GERTRUDE KERR 

Sergeant - - - - HERBERT BURDGE 

The class flower chosen was the delicate and fragrant lily-of-the-valley, 

of which we are still proud. The colors chosen were the present colors, 

Nile-green and cream. 

The faculty for the first year of school consisted of Mr. Hufif, Miss Beck, 
Miss Lehman and Mr. Kleuh. 

Social Events 
The only social gathering held during our Freshman year was held at 
the home of Ermin Bixler. Results of this party may yet be seen by the 
flashlight taken on this occasion. 



YEAR 1913-14— SOPHOMORE YEAR 

At the beginning of the Sophomore year the membership of the class was 
twenty-seven, five having given up their high school career. They were, 
Minnie Baumgartner, Trueman Ray, Herbert Burdge, Ella Garber and Mary 
Lehman. We felt sorry for our loss, but rejoiced over the arrival of two new 
members, namely Pearl Atz and Martha Lehman. 

Class Officers A 

President - - - - CLARENCE HIRSCHY 

Vice-President - - - - LESTER SMITH 

Secretary-Treasurer - - - PEARL ATZ 

Pianist - - - - SYBILLA SPRUNGER 

Sergeant ----- JOE HABEGGER 
13 



The faculty members were Mr. Huff, Miss Beck, Miss Grimm, Miss 
Smith, Mr. Records and Mr. Schindler. 

Social Events 

The parties of the class held during the second year were four in number. 
The first was held in Lehman's Grove ; the second was a pigeon roast, held 
at the home of Frances Reusser in the old "shop". The third was a sleighing 
party, held at the home of Clinton Soldner. This is very memorable, for the 
snow was nearly gone, but by no means forgotten. The fourth and last of the 
year was a farewell party, given for Sylvan Rohrer, held at the home of Joe 
Habegger. 



YEAR 1914-15— JUNIOR YEAR 

At the beginning of our third year the class roll was again decreased by 
the removal of Sylvan Rohrer to Texas and the entry of Martha Lehman to 
the class of 1915. Martha Boegly and Ada Heare withdrew during the year. 
Class Officers 
President - - - - LESTER SMITH 

Vice-President - - - ILMA BAUMGARTNER 

Secretary-Treasurer - - CORDELIA RIESEN 

The class decided to have our president act as representative in the 
teachers' representative body. During the Junior year we decided to continue 
the publication of The Budget and the officers, elected for the year 1915-16, 
assisted the class of 1915 to publish their Annual. 

Our class motto was also decided upon during the Junior year and reads 
as follows: "Labor omnia vincit," or: "Labor overcomes all things." 

The faculty consisted of Mr. Huff, Miss Beck, Miss Prange and Mr. 
Sprunger. 

Social Events 
Five social gatherings of the class were held during the Junior year. 
The first was held in Lehman's Grove ; the second at the home of Frances 
Reusser; the third was a sleighing party to the home of Pearl Atz ; the 
fourth, likewise, was a sleighing party to the home of Gilbert Hirschy's. 

The last and most important was the Junior reception, given at the home 
of Dr. and Mrs. Amos Reusser. During the summer Leona and Lorena 
Sprunger entertained the class. These social events all go to prove that the 
Juniors were surely jolly Juniors. 

YEAR 1915-16— SENIOR YEAR 

The dignified ( ?) Seniors entered upon their last year of high school work 
with heart and soul to make it the crowning year. Twenty-three were en- 
rolled but the number soon decreased to twenty-two through the removal 
of Lulu Allen to Bluffton, Ind. The class purchased class pins and rings, of 
which they are very proud. The class, as a whole, proved to be a successful 
class and graduated with honors. 

14 



We, the Senior class of 1916. are the first to graduate under a nine- 
months' course. 

Class Officers 
President - - - - RAYMOND WULLIMAN 

Vice-President - - - ^ ERMIN BIXLER 

Secretary-Treasurer - - ^ DAVID BIXLER 

The faculty consisted of Mr. Huff, Miss Beck, Miss Prange, Miss Baum- 
gartner and Mr. Sprunger. 

Social Events 
The first class meeting, which was a reception to the Freshmen, was held 
at the home of Joe Habegger. This was given in or-der to initiate the Fresh- 
men into the social part of high school life. The second social event was a 
farewell party, held in Lehman's grove in honor of Lulu Allen. The third 
social was held at the home of Sybilla Sprunger. The social life of the class 
was enjoyed by all, and, in order to keep up the spirit of the class in coming 
years, the following officers were elected for the year 1916-17: President, 
Lorena Sprunger; vice-president, Irene Stucky ; secretary-treasurer, David 
Bixler. L. S., '16. 



SENIOR REMINISCENCE 



Ah, distinctly we remember, in that cool and bright September, 
When we first, all weak-kneed Freshmen, entered the assembly door ; 
We recall our first class picture — and it surely is a bore. 
We were Freshmen — nothing more. 

The next year our class grew stronger, as we stayed in high school longer, 
And we came to find a meaning in that title. Sophomore, 
For the fact is, we were working — ah, no more they found us shirking. 
Over Geom we labored somewhat harder than before. 

We, as Juniors, were disdainful — we were free from comp's, so painful 
And in spring we were delighted when our rules were things of yore, 
We were rare and radiant Juniors in those happy days of yore. 
Only Juniors — nothing more. 

Senior year bore to extinction, we forsook the class distinction, 
Fuss, fancies and old traditions which were followed years before. 
For the truth was, we were older, and our minds were growing bolder. 
As we tried to do things bigger than were ever done before. 
15 



A JUNIOR'S TALE 

(The wryter is somewhat indebted to one Geoffrey Chaucer.) 



Whan Commone Schoole with its last examme is o'er, 

Thanne longen folks to gon on pilgrimages, 

And after man hath closed its friendly door, 

And students for to seeken newer strondes. 

And specially from the shire's ende, 

Of Adams Countye to Berne they wende. 

That learning and that labor for to fynde. 

That them shall holpen thru this darke world's grynde. 

When I had wended on my pilgrimage 

To Berne High with full devout courage. 

One day was come to that communitie 

Well nigh five and twenty in a companye, 

Of sondry folk, by adventure ifalle 

In felaschipe, and pilgrims were we alle. 

Who would in books for four yeres studye welle, 

That in the ende the teachers all might telle 

How many thanne had come out to be wyse. 

This was our waye thence as I you devyse : 

The first yere in that lande had much of woe, 

And many from our number back did goe ; 

The older folk who'd been there long before. 

Did cryticise our studye more and more. 

All thru that tyme our sorrow's o'er us swept.. 

We weren "Freshies" and "Sophomores", ill kept; 

But from the gloome our triumph did appeare, 

So that whann finished was last yere. 

Our place was made amonge the men who were— 

We love the honored name of Junior. 

And in the winter, whan the snowe did falle. 

Our good knights rallied to the basket-balle. 

In this and other sports they fought full welle ; 

In track did they the rest by far excelle. 

Our delegates are scene in every field, 

Where one for classe a lance can wield. 

Well given— our receptione did full welle delyght 

All those who a'ttended on that faire nvghte. 

The nobilitie were escorted to the door 

By a 'squire with golde buttons behind and 'fore, 

We move in all societie with ease— 

Our knights of far renowne, and faire ladies; 

With many a partye do we lyghten lyf, 

And so forget our labor and our stryfe. 

We are in sooth a merrye companye. 

We'll have a jolly tyme, whyle here we be. 

We're glad there is a full twelve months ahead 

Before we needs must earne our dailie bread. 

We'll labor, strive, and ever bravely fyght 

To uphold dere true Maroone and Whyte. 

Now, whan we've brot you greetings, everyone, 

This tale will, like all ended tales, be done. 



The J 



unior 



CI 



ass 



OFFICERS 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary-Treasurer 



TILLMAN HIRSCHY 

AUSTIN LEHMAN 

EDISON SPRUNGER 



Motto 

'Paddle your own canoe" 



Class Colors 

Maroon and White 



Class Flower 

White Lilac 



CARL AMSTUTZ 
AGNES ATZ 
IRA BAUMGARTNER 
RUTH BOCKMAN 
ANDREW COOK 
GERHARD FRANZ 
PAUL KATTMANN 



Class Roll 

AUSTIN LEHMAN 
MENNO LEHMAN 
NAOMI MARTZ 
WILMA RAWLEY 
AGNES SCHENK 
CLIFTON GILLIOM 
ELMER GILLIOM 
CLARENCE SPRUNGER 



AMOS HABEGGER 
IRVIN HIRSCHY 
TILLMAN HIRSCHY 
VELMA SCHUG 
HOMER SIPE 
IRA STUCKEY 
EDISON SPRUNGER 




The Sophomores 



Last year our class ftmiul out what it meant to bt initiated. Everything 
was new to us, but perhaps we made no worse mistakes than classes before 
us have done. 

This year we commenced school with a little more confidence because 
we were now Sophomores. Mathematics was our greatest trouble, but after 
the first few weeks of Geometry were over we felt more free and had time 
for pleasure. 

During the first semester we had a party at the home of a classmate and 
it was here that we took the opportunity of gettmg acquainted with our new- 
teachers. On Hallowe'en the second social gathering was held and it proved 
a success in giving everybody the Hallowe'en spirit. At our last party t'le 
big event was the pulling of our fortune. Who would have thought that 
Clinton Sprunger would be an orator, Irlene Franz a teacher, Edna Braun a 
missionary, and other members of the class such prominent personages as 
reformers, nurses, politicians, preachers, civil engineers, bachelors and oki 
maids! These social functions helped to keep our class united and developed 
a good class spirit. 

Although our class as yet has achieved nothing very brilliant, it is getting 
nearer the mark. This year se\-eral of its members have shown their literary 
ability by taking part in debate and many have taken the Bible Study which 
was offered. 

The Sophomore boys have tried to make headway in athletics and, 
although they received scratches and hurt noses in nearly every game of 
basket-ball, they are not discouraged and their practice will soon show 
results. 

The Sophomore year, as a whole, has been quite successful and we are 
proud that it still has twenty-seven members. H. E. N., '18. 



The Sophomore Class 



OFFICERS 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary-Treasurer 



HELEN REUSSER 

ARVEDA RUMPLE 

HELEN NICKEL 



Class Colors 

Blue and Cream 

WILLIS BAUMGARTNER 
EDNA BRAUN 
EDNA BURKHALTER 
SELMA BURKHALTER 
ERNEST COOK 
ERLINE FRANZ 
WALTER GILLIOM 
CARL HARRIS 
SULICIA HOFSTETTER 



Motto 

"Be progressive" 



Class Roll 

ARTHUR LEHMAN 
FRANKLIN LEHMAN 
FRIEDA LEHMAN 
EDWARD LIECHTY 
HELEN NICKEL 
AREA RAY 
HELEN REUSSER 
ARVEDA RUMPLE 
AUGUSTA SPRUNGER 



Class Flower 
Goldenrod 

ELIZ. V. d. SMISSEN 
ALIEDA SPRUNGER 
CLINTON SPRUNGER 
HOWARD SPRUNGER 
VICTOR SPRUNGER 
GLADYS STAUFFER 
EUGENE WECHTER 
PAUL LUGINBILL 
RUSSELL MERRIMAN 




The Class of 1919 



It was in the fall of 1915 when the Tribe of 1919, a band of youths and 
maidens, twenty-one in number, gathered in the halls of the Berne high 
school, and, while they were assembled "Sally" arose and said: "Friends, 
let us this day select from our number a leader who shall direct the activities 
of the Tribe of '19 through the first year with much credit and wisdom." 
Thereupon the tribe, after careful council, determined that "Kunzie" shall 
be made this great and mighty leader. 

This great and mighty leader directed the activities, which were many 
and of great import, with a sagacious eye and a mighty arm. He brought 
his tribe of youths and maidens through the initiative rites of the powerful 
and ancient Tribe of '16 unmolested: he rallied his stalward and swift-footed 
comrades together to defend their colors against the haughty Tribe of '18, 
who arrayed themselves against the youthful tribe in basket-ball, and, after 
many a great struggle the youthful tribe crushed the haughty to the ground 
and carried home the bacon, and in all battles, both mental and physical, 
did he direct the maneuvers of his tribe par excellence. Because of the many 
great victories won, the tribe presented its brave warriors with good sweaters 
as a token of appreciation for their valor. 

Thus the Tribe of '19 surmounted the tribulations of the Freshman year 
and today stand ready to do honor to their colors through the three years of 
tribulations that lie between them and freedom. 




The Freshman Class 



OFFICERS 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary-Treasurer 



FRANK KUNTZ 
LESTER SCHUG 
FRANK MILLER 



Motto 

'En, Avant" (Forward) 



Class Colors 

Purple and Gold 



Class Flower 

Red Rose 



SURELDA RIESEN 
JOHN SCHINDLER - 
VICTOR BAGLEY 
LYDIA LIECHTY 
LESLIE SPRUNGER- 
ESTHER BINTZ 



Class Roll 

LESTER SCHUG 
PAUL SPRUNGER 
FRANK KUNTZ ' 
HAROLD REUSSER 
LEOTA SPRUNGER 



ROLAND V. d. SMISSEN 
RUTH ROHRER 
RALEIGH SIPE - 
FRANK MILLER - 
MARIE HILTY - 



WILLARD HIRSCHY- RALPH MARTZ 



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27 



EDITORIALS 



SELF-GOVERNMENT 

Dr. W. L. Bryan, president of the Indiana State nni\-ersity, in The In- 
diana Daily Student says: "I believe heartily in the maximum of self-govern- 
ment in families, schools and universities. It is true that parents, teachers 
and faculties have the heavy legal and moral responsibility of seeing that 
good habits and customs are established and maintained, and can not divest 
themselves of this responsibility in case bad habits and customs are tolerated 
by saying that they have turned matters over to others. On the other hand, 
there must be a measure of self-government even in the case of little children, 
and as young people grow older there must be more and more. Good S3'S- 
tems of self-government have sometimes been maintained in the high schools 
and even in the elementary schools. There are small colleges and great 
universities where excellent systems of self-government are maintained. In 
general, faculties are willing to turn over such matters to students as far as 
students are willing to become seriously responsible." 

How long will it be till Berne gets this spirit! There is no reason why 
our progressive little town should not take up the new ideas of education. 

We think the honor-system of self-government would be a great im- 
provement in our schools. Because the schools, with school spirit very 
much like the school spirit here, have been successful with these new sys- 
tems. The pupils seem to be strong for a change. If everyone would try 
and put himself or herself in the students' place and give both sides a fair 
consideration, self-government would surely gain enough trust that it would 
be given an opportunity to show what it can do. And if it is introduced, 
everyone who is true to himself will find one of the greatest things ever 
introduced into a school. 



One of the greatest factors in the appearance and general make-up of a 
school paper is the service of the company that does the work. 

That is particularl}' true of The Budget which is printed by the Berne 
Witness Company. The various efficient and experienced employees of this 
establishment have done their best to make The Budget a neat and well 
organized magazine. 

The ideas and suggestions given us by the heads of the different depart- 
ments have been instrumental in giving the paper its present form. The 
personal interest and enthusiasm shown by every employe of the company 
with whom we have come in contact has added much to the pleasure of the 
work and has been an excellent example. 

It is fitting, therefore, that we take this opportunity to express our ap- 
preciation and gratitude for the efficient and loyal service of the Berne 
Witness Company that has done so much to make The Budget one of the 
best of its class. 

29 



Some of our readers may think that the Editorial department has be- 
come rather lean this year; we think the same in some instances. In this 
final issue we thought it best to make known the deep and underlying reason 
for the said poverty of material. That reason is that we were so deeply im- 
pressed by the scathing criticisms received during the year that we were 
unable to think of any safe subject to write on. So we thought that the less 
said, the better. Hence the unusual silence in the editorial section. 



Since the beginning of school in September, 1915, you have heard much 
about school spirit. Many calls have been made upon you to support the 
numerous activities of the high school and help make them a success. All 
of you are acquainted with the plea : "Come out and show your school spirit 
if you have any." We, the StafT, feel that we have had the support of the 
school both in subscribing and contributing. It might, however, have been 
better. Yet, we are always thankful for the friends we have had and grate- 
ful for the support given. The student that takes an active interest in all 
the activities of the school, whether or not his interest lies along each par- 
ticular line, shows a good "school spirit" which, we are pleased to state, is 
far from being extinct in the B. H. S. To you, the student body of the 
Berne high school, we bid a farewell and express our heartiest wishes for 
the prosperity and success for the future publication of The Budget. 



As this is the last issue of "The Budget" for this year, the editor wishes 
to acknowledge his indebtedness to many friends in general and few in par- 
ticular. Much credit for the success of the publication is due to faithful con- 
tributors, and to the Seniors who have always been ready to work and boost 
for the general welfare of the magazine. He also wishes to express his ap- 
preciation for the interest and splendid support of the student body, faculty 
and to the staff, who have been untiring in their efforts to help and advise; 
and also to the kind friends whose generous praise has meant so much. 




LITERARY 



PATRIOTISM 



What is patriotism? Did you ever stop to reflect upon what it embraces? 
There is born in every manly breast the determination to defend the thing 
he loves. We strike down the enemy who would invade our homes, and 
guard our interests and fire-places at the peril of our lives. There is no 
sentiment so strong as love : no sacrifice too great for those we love. This 
is the underlying principle of genuine patriotism, the foundation of true loy- 
alty to country. The patriot is he who, loving his country, is willing not 
only to fight, but, if need be. to die for it. It is this sentiment which gives 
to human governments their strength, security, and permanency. It is this 
sentiment which nerves the soldier to duty, and gains his consent to service 
and sacrifice. The strongest and best government is the one which rests 
upon the reverent affection of its own people ; and the nearer the government 
to the people, and the people to the government, the stronger becomes the 
sentiment of patriotism, and the stronger becomes the government itself. 
The laws are of little or no value if they do not have behind them the respect 
and love of the people. When patriotism is gone out of the hearts of the 
masses, the country is nearing dissolution and death. 

Did you ever seriously consider what it means to be a fighting patriot? 
Many people preach and profess patriotism, but the true patriot is he who 
practices it, and he can seldom practice it by proxy. Patriotism is the abso- 
lute consecration of self to country ; it may call for the total abandonment of 
business ; it may involve the turning away from plans which have been 
formed for a life's career, the surrendering of bright prospects, the giving up 
of ambition in a chosen work, the sundering of the ties of home and family, 
almost the snapping of the heart-strings which bind us to those we love. 
It may mean disease, contracted by exposure, or from wounds in battle. 
It may mean imprisonment, insanity or death. It may mean hunger, thirst 
and starvation. 

This, however, will seem insignificant in that overmastering love of 
country, in that burning patriotism which should fill the souls of the boys 
and men, in that high and noble purpose which will then animate all, that 
they may be able to save to themselves, to their families and their fellow 
countrymen the best and purest government ever known, and to mankind 
the largest and best civilization in the world. 

RAYMOND WULLIMAN, '16. 
31 



OPPORTUNITY 



Many young people size up life in a wrong way, in a pessimistic way. 
They say, "If I had opportunities" — they think only of the other fellow, the 
chance he had and how he succeeded. 

The world is always full of opportunities. No person in the United 
States can rightfully say that circumstances have shut out his opportunities. 
Think of some of our great men, such as Booker T. Washington, Abraham 
Lincoln, J. J. Hill, and countless others who were poor people with few oppor- 
tunities. History has many examples. 

It is cowardly to say we have had no advantages, and no one who ever 
says so is worthy of becoming great. It is the people who pick up the oppor- 
tunities which others have thrown away that actually become famous. 

We cannot wait until some "great" chance presents itself, but we must 
make use daily of all little opportunities that come in our way. Every day 
we may tell the truth when a lie might pass ; we may be kind and gentle to 
the unfortunate, and do the right even if our companions do scorn us. It 
takes courage for all these things, but we should do them rather than be 
weaklings who yield to temptation. 

No one can be careless about every-day duties and then be ready when 
some great opportunity presents itself. We must always have a desire for 
knowledge which we can obtain by observation, reading, study and conver- 
sation with those who are more intelligent than we. We must not associate 
with people who are idle and careless. We need the spirit of work above all. 

No boy or girl today, with ordinary intelligence, living in the United 
States, can lack opportunities. They are all around us. If we make one 
mistake, we should try never to make the same again ; thereby one grows. 
Do not think that opportunity knocks at your door but once. That has been 
disproved by noted men and women. 

There are yet questions unanswered, problems to be solved, inventions 
to be improved, knowledge to be gained, fortune, fame and honor to be 
achieved by those who care for them. 

IL:JA BAUMGARTNER, '16. 



"CHRISTINE' 



"If I could only hear her play the old violin!" These were the words 
uttered by a wounded soldier. The doctor who was at his bedside begged 
of him to tell his sorrowful story, and this he did as soon as he was relieved 
from his terrible suffering. His story was pathetic, and it seemed to him 
MS though he could not finish it, but he did it with the courage of a soldier, 
and this was his story : 

"Many years ago I lived in Virginia, down at the foot of a mountain. 
My parents were poor and our mode of li\ ing very simple. Our little homo 
32 



was a log one, but many happy years were spent there. Across the field was 
the beautiful old mansion with the ivy creeping about it — that was where 
Christine lived, a dear little girl. Her golden curls clung close to her head 
and the sweet innocent look on her face made everyone love her. Although 
her parents were very wealthy and mine were poor, that never made any 
difference to either of us. 

"Nearly every afternoon she would come over and play. My father wai 
a good violinist, and we would sit together for hours and play the instruments 
until we both made quite a success of it. 

"But death visited our home in the late fall and I lost my mother when 
1 was but eighteen. It broke up our home and I was compelled to leave. 
My dear old grandmother in Germany earnestly begged me to come over 
and live with her. I dreaded to leave America, but did it for my grand- 
mother's sake. My last days there were spent with my father and Christine 
and were days of pleasure and sadness. The secret of my story has not yet 
been revealed, and it is this — she promised to marry me. The last evening 
I spent with her she played that beautiful 'Humoreske' with such sweet ex- 
pression that I burst into tears. Then I picked up my violin and we played 
our last piece together. Our parting was very sad, but we comforted our- 
selves by thinking of the future when I would return and claim my bride. 

"My grandmother helped me in every possible way, and I received a 
♦ hree-years' college course. At the age of twenty-one, instead of finishing 
college, I joined the army. When war broke out, I was sent to war as I 
was in the standing army. My poor old grandmother was very heart-broken 
about it, for her husband and her only son were killed in the Franco-Prussian 
war. 

"Three months' time proved that she had reason to worry, because at 
that time I was seriously wounded by a bomb and was taken captive by the 
English." 

Glancing up, his eyes fell on a crucifix at the side of his bed. For a few 
moments he was silent, then the doctor saw his lips move and, leaning over 
to hear the softly uttered words, heard him praying that he might yet see the 
beautiful face of Christine. 

Just then he was seized by an attack of severe pain and his wasted body, 
1 eing unable to endure the terrible agony, fainted away. Several hours later, 
as he slowly regained consciousness, he heard the beautiful strains of a violin 
and his thoughts were immediately back to old Virginia. Could he possibly 
be awake or was it all a dream? But the music came nearer and nearer, and 
.■inally a figure stopped before his open door. Could it be — was it possible 
that his prayer was answered? The music stopped suddenly as the young 
lady's eyes met those of the sick boy. "James!" she cried, springing to his 
bedside. "Christine!" he whispered, and she flung her arms about his neck. 

The doctor, on his next round through the hospital, found James much 
improved and the lately arrived American Red Cross nurse, who had been 
doing so much good for the patients, at his bedside. James smiled as he en- 
tered, and without being told, the doctor knew it was Christine. 

FRANCES REUSSER, '16. 
33 



GRADUATION AT WOODBURY 



It was the merry month of May, the month of flowers and beauty. This 
seemed to harmonize with the pleasant atmosphere which seemed to surround 
the little school of Woodbury. 

The Seniors were all looking forward to a bright commencement which 
was about to take place. The Woodbury school had the reputation of being 
a very good school and therefore graduation from this school bestowed quite 
a bit of honor upon the graduate. Everybody made elaborate plans for com- 
mencement week and the Seniors were especially busy with orations, ex- 
aminations, dresses and the other graduating plans that usually accompany 
these affairs. But there was one girl in this class, named Marguerite, who 
was dreading the time of graduation to approach. Her outer appearances 
did not reveal this fact to other scholars and especially not to her girl friends 
who were to graduate also. The cause of this secret dread was the fact that 
she could not afford a new dress such as all the other girls had. When she 
would be with her girl friends she would join them in their plans and really 
imagine that she was going to have a new dress also. But Marguerite never 
betrayed to the others that she could not have a new dress, and all the girls 
seemed happy to think that they could all graduate in nice new gowns. 

But when Marguerite would reach her home and there find her mother 
working hard, it would all come back to her that she was not going to have 
that dress she had planned. Not only Marguerite was sad, for the mother 
worried because her daughter could not have a new dress ; she keenly realized 
that Marguerite would feel out of place in her old muslin, and especially when 
she would have to deliver her oration. 

It was the custom in Woodbury for each graduate to deliver his or her 
oration in the town hall, which was always beautifully decorated and where 
large crowds would assemble. Each graduate would deliver his or her ora- 
tion the same evening and then it would be decided which had the best. 
Each one tried hard, and no one even thought of Marguerite's winning, be- 
cause they were sure she would not make the best appearance. But Mar- 
guerite at last tried to console herself with the thought that she might excel 
in her oration, if she could not have the dress. So she devoted all her time 
to her oration. 

When the night came when the orations were to be delivered, everybody 
seemed anxious and excited, and even Marguerite invited a little feeling of 
comfort in the thought of winning the oration, but at the same time the dress 
was not entirely forgotten. 

The time for commencing the evening program had arrived. Every 
available space was filled, for the class was large and most of the members 
were wealthy and had many friends. The piano sounded forth the opening 
notes of the march. All was excitement. Everybody was eager to get the 
first glimpse of some friend or relative. 'Oh ! how splendid she looks," 
"Isn't Annabel's dress elaborate?" and similar remarks were quite audible. 

The first oration of the evening was delivered by Marjory Weicking, 
34 



Judge Weicking's daughter. She stepped forward, dressed in a gown of the 
latest fashion. But alas, her mind evidently was busied with outer appear- 
ances, for memory seemed to fail her and she was unable to finish her oration 
successfully. 

The next was Annabel Ryan. She was a very bright girl and many 
were sure that she would be the winner of the evening. And so they pro- 
ceeded. Finally came Marguerite's turn. She stepped to the front with a 
slow, measured step and a very determined look on her face. 

Nobody seemed to show any particular excitement about this plain girl. 
But in the back part of the audience sat a plain-looking mother, and the face 
of Marguerite was suddenly illumined with a smile of wonderful beauty. 
There was a hush — with what eloquence this girl was speaking! Never 
before had they noticed her fine quality of tone, and never before had they 
seen her simple face transformed to one of such exquisite beauty. With 
what wonderful enthusiasm and eagerness she spoke! The plain dress was 
quite forgotten. No one gave that any thought. So completely had she 
captivated her audience that the hall rang with hearty applause. She was, of 
course, unanimously declared the victor of the evening. 

Marguerite felt very happy over her success, but scarcely happier than 
her mother, for the prize of the evening was a scholarship at one of the 
leading colleges. It had always been the mother's desire to give her daughter 
a liberal education. Now the problem had been solved. 

LORENA SPRUNGER, '16. 



THE LOST CHURCH 



One day, while waiting for my train at a small country station, I took 
out a few snapshots I had recently received from a friend in the Philippines, 
to help me pass my time. I was very much interested in one picture of a 
beautiful old cathedral, surrounded by woods, but I was rather puzzled at 
what my friend had written beneath it. 

"The Lost Church," said a voice at my elbow. "Have you seen it?" I 
turned, startled to find a short, rather heavy-set man, standing at my shoulder. 
He had a heavy grey beard, twinkling eyes somewhat deep set and bushy 
grey eye-brows. In one hand he carried a small canvas bag, while in the 
other he had a cane about three feet long, with a beautiful blackhorn handle. 

"No," I replied, smiling, "I have not even heard of it before. I was 
wondering why it is called 'The Lost Church'." 

"That," said the little gentleman, sitting down beside me, "is because it 
is so hard to find. It was built by the Spaniards and is somewhere between 
Bai Lake and Manila, nearer the lake than Manila. It is also close to the 
Pasing river, but nobody can tell exactly where it is, for even after they have 
found it once, it is as difficult as ever to find again. Some people have spent 
four or five days hunting for it, and when they did find it, it was only an acci- 
dent. Sounds like a fairy story, doesn't it?" 
35 



"Yes," I laughed. "Then — have you ever been there?" I asked. The 
man smiled thoughtfully. "Yes, I have, although that, too, was an accident." 
And then, as I looked curiously at him, he went on: "It was when I was 
a young man and anxious for adventures. A friend of mine and I had de- 
termined to visit the Philippines, so early in the fall (for we thought the 
winter over there would be warm enough for us) we started from San Fran- 
cisco. We had a very stormy trip except for the last day and then we saw 
our first beautiful sunset. The ocean was quiet, with hardly a ripple: the 
sky a beautiful clear blue with only a few white fleecy clouds. The sun had 
been bright all day, but as it set it resembled a great ball of fire sinking into 
the water, and as my friend and I stood watching it, we saw the buildings of 
Manila rise like purple shadows between us and the sun. 

"We landed at Manila the next morning, and for about a week were 
kept busy seeing the sights. Then, one evening we heard of 'the lost church'. 
My friend and I thought it very queer that such a large building would be so 
hard to find, and boasted that we could find it, and that without a guide. 
Accordingly we started the next morning with provisions enough for two 
days, although we said we would be back that evening. We traveled all 
morning, but found no sight of the church. Late in the afternoon we reached 
Bai Lake and knew that we had passed it. We camped at the lake that night 
and the next morning started back, determined to find the church. However, 
we were not so sure as the day before and decided on a new plan. We di- 
vided our provisions between us, and I went inland about a mile, while my 
friend stayed closer to the river than we had the day before ; the one that 
would find the church first was to fire his revolver. I traveled hard all day 
trying to cover so wide a path as possible, but still had not found it when 
the sun began to set. I then thought I must be close to Manila, but after 
walking for about an hour, came to the sudden and startling realization that 
I was lost. I fired several shots, but received no answer. The sun was 
entirely down by this time and my friend had my compass. As I was hungry, 
I sat down and ate my supper, saving a little for breakfast, provided I didn't 
reach Manila in time for that. I traveled on for quite a while, not knowing 
where I was going, until finally I saw through the trees the light of a fire. 
Thinking only that I had found friends, I quickened my .steps and soon 
reached the edge of a clearing. Then I regretted my lack of caution and 
would have turned back, but I saw that I was discovered. I had run into a 
small band of Igorotes. I was not left in doubt as to whether I should stay 
or not, for several came over immediate!}' and hustled me to the camp fire, 
where I was searched and then tied to a tree. Then the council began. I 
knew nothing of their language and could only imagine by their looks and 
actions what the outcome would be. However, they did not seem to be able 
to come to an agreement and seemed to have postponed making their decision 
the next day, for, leaving two to guard me, they lay down at some distance 
from me and went to sleep. I was very tired, and in spite of my nervousness 
and uncomfortable position, I finally dozed oil. I must have slept more 
soundly than I thought, for, though I don't know how it happened, when I 
awoke I found myself lying on the floor of a building. I was still bound 
36 



hand and foot, and, although the ropes were not drawn tight enough to make 
me uncomfortable, I could not work myself loose. The high-colored windows 
gave a very dim light so I could make out very little as to what kind of a 
place I was in. It seemed very large, and by what I could see, I guessed it 
to be a temple to one of the gods of the savages. I remember wondering if 
I was to be a sacrifice to that particular god. I stayed there for two days 
without a thing to eat, and only my thoughts for company, and they weren't 
the pleasantest kind, for I was nervous. On the evening of the second day, 
however, I heard voices outside and somebody opened the door. I thought 
it might be better not to say anything, but just then I heard my friend's 
voice. "So this is 'the lost church'," I heard him say in an awed tone. Then 
I called. Well, they found me, took me out and fed me. It seemed that my 
friend had reached Manila rather late in the evening, two days before and 
supposed that I would come soon, but in the morning, when I had not yet 
arrived, a searching party was started. They had seen nothing of the Igor- 
otes, although several small parties had been heard of. Tha* didn't make 
much difference, though, for they had found 'the lost church' and me at the 
same time. I have visited the church several times since, but my first visit 
cured me of some of my bravado." 

Just then my train came in and I had only time for a hurried goodby. 
After the station was far behind, I remembered with regret that I did not 
know even the name of my strange acquaintance. 

CHARLOTTE STENGEL, '16. 



NUMBER NINE'S DRIVER 



On the western plain, close by one of the great railroads, was located a 
small cottage. The cottage was small and plain, but one glance at the cozy 
rooms was enough to make one know that the occupants were tactful, and 
had once been used to better things. This was true, for Lucy Grey was the 
daughter of the president of the road that passed so close to the small 
cottage. Several years before she had incurred the disfavor of her father 
and he had deprived her of the wealth that should have been hers. On this 
account she and her husband were forced to live in quite reduced circum- 
stances. She always stood in the door and watched the locomotives with 
their great loads of freight and passengers go thundering past, and at these 
times she thought of her father and wondered how soon she would be per- 
mitted to see him. She was interested, too, in the locomotives, not only 
because they were her father's but because she had often rode in them and 
knew as much about managing them as did the best engineer on the road. 

One dark winter evening, just as she went to bolt the door for the night, 
she heard the No. 9 coming at full speed and she observed that it was at least 
fifteen minutes late. Just as the engine was almost in front of the cottage, 
it suddenly stopped with a strange creaking sound and the brakemen and 
conductors quickly scrambled out, followed by many anxious people, to see 
37 



what the cause of this stop was. It was found out that the engineer was 
sick and not able to run the rest of the trip. What was to be done? The train 
must be in the city within an hour, and there seemed to be no one who could 
manage the engine. The engineer was carried to the cottage and there taken 
care of. When Lucy found out what the trouble was, she offered to run the 
train to the city. At first she was laughed at, but was finally permitted to 
take her place in the engineer's cab. She adjusted the brakes and No. 9 
glided steadily away toward the great city. Lucy thought of the hundreds 
of lives in her control. She had never driven so fast before ; the night was 
very dark; the train was still several minutes late, but her hand was steady 
and she was determined to arrive at the city at the regular time. She threw 
the throttle wide open and over miles of barren country the engine fairly flew. 
At last, far ahead, she saw the lights of the city. When the powerful loco- 
motive finally came to a stop in the train yard, Lucy's father came out of 
the office and stood still, astonished. She was exhausted and could not walk 
a step when she got out of the cab. When her father saw what a great 
sacrifice she had made for his sake, he forgave her. Now the little cottage 
is deserted and Lucy lives in a great mansion in the city. 

AGNES SCHENK, '17. 



The High School Officers 




ERMIN BIXLER, President 

FRANCES REUSSER, VicePres. JOE HABEGGER, Treasurer. 

RUTH ROHRER, Secretary 

38 



Literary Societies 



The literary programs this year were, as a whole, very good. They were 
generally instructive as well as entertaining and showed that the pupils had 
put much preparation on their respective posts. The chief aim of the Literary 
societies is to keep up the literary spirit in the high school. 

The Literary societies also give opportunity to a student to show his 
talents in oratory, debate, music (vocal or instrumental) and public speaking. 
If a student has taken an active part in one of these literary societies, he will 
find it a great help to him in future life. And all will be glad that they had 
the opportunity to be a member of one of the Literary societies of the gooci 
old B. H. S. 




Alpha Literary Society 



FRANCES REUSSER 
HELEN REUSSER 
MENNO LEHMAN 
PAUL LUGINBILL 
SYBILLA SPRUNGER 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Sergeant 

Pianist 



39 




LESTER SMITH 
IRVIN HIRSCHY 
RUTH ROHRER 
WILLARD HIRSCHY 
IRENE STUCKEY 



Arena Literary Society 

OFFICERS 

President 

Vice-President 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Sergeant 

Pianist 



ARENA MALE QUARTET 
40 




HOW HAPPY WE WOULD BE 



If things would be as students say 

How happy we would be ! 
If everything went just our way, 

How happy we would be! 
If English IV would be no more, 
If Brains would not be a bore — 
And cease to look as though he's sore, 
How happy we would be! 

If the Budget would get some news, 
How happy we would be! 

If Joel wouldn't get the blues. 
How happy we would be! 

If our deportment were but a joke. 

Would then not our teachers croak? 
How happy "We" would be! 

If Miss Beck would not look so wise. 
How happy we would be ! 

If Sprunger left ofif his disguise, 
How happy we would be! 

If Abe were not so lank and lean ; 

And Freshmen didn't look so green, 
How happy we would be ! 



41 



German Department 



The German society of the Berne high school was organized at the 
beginning of the school year 1915-16, this being the first German society ever 
formed in the Berne schools. This was done under the direction of the Ger- 
man instructor, Miss Anna Prange. The society was organized in order to 
advance the German language and especially German conversation and cus- 
toms. The business meetings were always conducted in the German as 
well as the socials which were held every month. The members of this 
society consisted of all the German students and any other students that 
could speak the German language. 

The officers who were elected when the society first was organized were : 
Lorena Sprunger, president; Leona Sprunger, vice-president; Ira Baum- ■ 
gartner, secretary-treasurer; Alieda Sprunger, pianist. The officers, elected 
for the coming year, 1916-17, are: Ira Baumgartner. president; Menno Leh- 
man, vice-president ; Franklin Lehman, secretary-treasurer ; Alieda Sprunger, 
pianist. 

The German society, as a whole, was enjoyed by all and proved to be 
quite a success in furthering the German in our schools. It is hoped that 
this organization may grow in number and spirit in the following years. 
We owe thanks to Miss Prange, our German instructor, for taking the 
leadership into her hands and organizing the German society. 

LORENA "sprunger. 





DOMESTIC SCIENCE CLASS 



Dome^ic Science 



The main purpose throughout this course has been to inspire the girls 
with respect for all household duties and especially a love for cooking as 
an art and as a science, for, truly, it is both. 

The greater part of our time was devoted to the study of foods and the 
fundamental principles which underlie their preparation for the table. Train- 
ing in the application of these principles was also given. Some time, how- 
ever, was given to the study of household management in general, and home 
economics. 

A one-year course is offered here, and up to this time the privilege to take 
this course has been extended to the girls of all the high school classes. 
A course in Cooking is also given to the girls of the Seventh grade and 3 
course in Sewing to the Eighth grade girls. 

For the high school class we have an eighty-minute period each day. 
As a rule we have been devoting two days a week to theory work and reci- 
tation and the remaining three days to practice in cooking. 

We have a nice large kitchen with plenty of light and fresh air, and a 
fine equipment. This year a set of dishes, silverware and some glassware 
were added so that we can now set a table with ten covers. For cooking we 
use electric stoves and ovens. 

44 



M 



USIC 



The music this year can certainly be called a success. The high school 
chorus became conspicuous chiefly because of its never appearing on a public 
program. Nevertheless, the chorus kept up the standard of former years. 

One of the great factors in making the chorus a success was the work 
of the instructor, Miss Baumgartner, and the pianist. Miss Sybilla Sprunger. 
All the students appreciated their work very much, knowing that it was a 
great help in bringing the chorus to its high standard. 

A new music book which contained most of the new classical music, 
that was not too difficult for high school chorus work, was used this year. 
This new book also added great interest to the work. 

In the fall a picked chorus was organized, but for various unknown rea- 
sons the work along this line had to be dropped. 

The orchestra, or rather the high school band, was noted chiefly for the 
amount of noise it made at regular rehearsals on Thursday mornings. It 
appeared in one public program, given sometime in February before the 
high school. 

It is hoped that in the future the "band" orchestra may change to a real 
orchestra with more string instruments than were available this year. 




.-\.REN.-\ STRIXG QU.\RTET 
45 



Good Sportsmanship 



(The following article, written by Coach Sprunger, has appeared in one 
of the former issues of our paper, but we consider it worthy of being pub- 
lished in our final issue for two reasons. First, it gives a general review of 
the first indoor basket-ball season ; and second, it gives the boys a good 
standard, by which they may judge good sportsmanship.) 

Berne high school has gone through its first full basket-ball season — 
and we are glad to be able to say, creditably. 

The season opened out of doors early in the fall and several interesting 
games were played both at home and abroad. About the beginning of De- 
cember playing was begun on Berne's first basket-ball floor, on the second 
floor of the Berne Artificial Stone Co.'s building. 

Unfortunately floor privileges could not be offered free. This was a 
rather unwelcome announcement ; but in order to make the undertaking 
financially successful, a small fee had to be charged for the privilege of play- 
ing. Also is it hard to make clear that high school athletics should be for 
all. The fact that many small villages in Indiana put out winning teams is 
due to the fact that they develop a team that will be sure to win. In order 
to do this the team only will be permitted to play, thus depriving the many 
of the sport. This is taking the primary purpose out of high school athletics. 

The primary object is good, wholesome exercise for all, and the secon- 
dary object (which is often made primary) is to win honors for the school. 

To make the primary purpose be first, all clique and faction tendencies 
must be suppressed, for those tendencies are sure to favor the few and not 
the many ; cliques may be instrumental in producing a winning team, but 
that, as stated above, is not the primary thing. 

We are proud to say that we have played a clean game. We have a clean 
record in all games played. Controversy arose in only two of our games. 
One was with Bryant with reference to a decision made by the referee, and 
it was agreed to abide by the decision of the state board. The ruling was, 
that it be called no game at all and therefore that game does not appear in 
our list of games. 

The second was with Geneva. Geneva, although winning, yet played an 
unsportsman-like game ; but apology and assurance of better treatment 
in the future again put us on friendly relations. 

It is easy enough to be good sports when winning, but to play a losing 
game really puts true sportsmanship to the test. 

Good sportsmanship further demands team work. In order to have team 

work there should be a team selected for the year. But this is impossible 

itnless the fellows take a keen interest in keeping their position on a team 

and fighting hard to hold that position. A coach will give the place to the 

48 



most deserving. The most deserving is the most faithful and not the one 
who thinks he can play, and therefore doesn't come out to practice with the 
team, or thinks he has an undisputed right to his place on the team. But a 
good sport, when he is forced out of his position, will not stand back and 
criticize and find fault ; he will endeavor to regain his position by showing 
unquestioned superiority. 

As a whole the elTort has been extremely worth while. There has been 
an interest created for this legitimate sport both among the pupils and the 
fans in the town. That there is a demand for this form of recreation, has 
been proven beyond a doubt. The following benefits that have been derived 
from it may be enumerated : 

1. It presented good and wholesome exercise to those who participated. 

2. It brought us into contact with surrounding towns. 

3. It kept boys away from objectionable pastimes such as loafing, gossip 
and low conversation. (There must have been thousands of hours in the 
aggregate thus spent.) 

4. It elevated class spirit. 

5. Honesty and team work was stimulated. 

Whether or not it shall be a branch of high school athletics in the future 
depends on the demands made by the pupils. If a keen interest is manifested 
and the game is kept in its proper place, the objections to the game will 
eventually be laid aside and its future in the high school in Berne will be 
assured. 




Track 



Track work was carried on to greater extent this year than ever before. 
Berne is getting a Httle deeper into athletics each year. Our men are doing 
better work than ever before. This was proven by the Decatur-Berne track 
meet, held one afternoon at Steele's park at Decatur, when Berne captured 
58 points out of 118. Last year's score was 82 to 43 in favor of Decatur. 
If Berne keeps on improving at this rate, we will soon have a championship 
team. 

The most interesting features of this year's track meet were C. Hirschy's 
running high jump and M. Lehman's pole vault. Ball from Decatur was 
<heir strong competitor in both events; but both of these events resulted in 
a tie between the two schools. 

Another track meet, which took place before the Decatur meet, was held 
at Bryant. Saturday, April 15, when Berne lost to Bryant by the score of 
39 to 69. This meet was more of a practice meet than a real track meet. 

The interesting feature of this event was the discuss-throwing which 
was not counted because Bryant was determined to use an undersized discus. 
They hurled this small discuss over 132 feet, thus breaking the state record 
by 15 feet (?). 

Those who are familiar with athletics may know that a man breaking 
the state record 15 ft. at a time, has a good opportunity to become famous. 

The worst feature of this meet was the opposing side's rooting, most 
of which was done by the "happy" enthusiasts of the burg. However, Berne 
always tries to return good for evil and thus keeps up the friendly relations 
with all her neighbors. 

Berne's star man in both meets was C. Gilliom, a tough and springy little 
fellow, without whom Berne would have been at a loss. The other five men 
who won the most points for their home school this spring follow in order: 
L Baumgartner, J. Habegger, D. Teeter, R. Wulliman and R. Blowers. 

Following are the scores by points: First, counting 5 points; second, 3; 
third, 1 point. 

Bryant Beme Decatur Berne 

100-Yard Dash 

1. Sisk (not timed) 5 1. Gay, 114-5 sec 5 

2. Gilliom 3 2. Colter 3 

3. Neely 1 3. Gilliom 1 

Discuss Throw 

(Dropped) 

1. Cottrel, 132 ft. 7 in 1. Blowers, 96 ft 5 

2. Glentzer 2. Gilliom 3 

3. Wright 3. Hirschy 1 

52 



1. Sisk, 23 1-S sec 


220- Yard Dash 

. . 5 I Gay 26 sec 


5 


2 Habegger 


3 ^ Colter 


3 


3. Wulliman 


1 3. J. Habegger 





Engle, 4 ft. 11 
Glentzer, tied 
Wulliman . . . 



Running High Jump 

4 1. Ball, 5 ft. 3 in. ... 

4 2. C. Hirschy (tied) 

1 3. T. Hirschy 



Engle, 66 3-5 sec. 

Habegger 

Pape 



440-Yard Dash 

1. Gay. 64 1-S 
3 2. Habegger 

3. Sprunger . 



Baumgartner. 9 ft. 3 in. 

Glentzer, tied 

Moore, tied 



Pole Vault 

3 1. Ball. 8 ft. 11 ii 

3 2. Lehman, tied 

3 3. Baumgartner 



Macklin 
Bagley 
Hirschy 



One-Mile Run 

5 1. Roop. 5 min. SO 

3 2. Bagley 

I 3. LuginbiU 



Franklin 
Teeter . 
Cottrel . 



Shot-put 

5 1. Teeter, 36 ft. 9^ 

3 2. Gilliom 

1 3. Blowers 



Gilliom, 18 ft. 7 in. 

Macklin, tied 

Wulliman 



Running Broad Jump 

4 1. Vizard. 17 ft. 10 in S 

4 2. Gilliom 

1 3. Wulliman 



Macklin. 2 m. 34 3-5 sec. 

Stoker 

Glentzer 



Half-Mile Run 

5 1. Roop 



n. 48 3-5 sec. 5 

2. Daniels 3 

3. Snyder 1 



Macklin. 4 ft. 6 in. 
Baumgartner .... 
Gilliom 



Standing High Jump 

5 1. Gilliom, 4 ft. S'A in 

3 2. Baumgartner, tied 

1 3. Ball r 



Macklin. 9 ft. 6 in 5 

Wulliman 

Gilliom 

220- Yard Hurdles 

Gilliom, 29 1-5 sec 

Sisk 3 

Neely , 1 



Standing Broad Jump 

5 1. Vizard, 9 ft. 2<A in 5 

3 2. Gilliom 

1 3. Ball 1 

Half-Mile Relay 
Decatur, 1 m. 53 2-5 sec... S 
Tug of War 



The Alumni 



The Alumni of the Berne high school now numbers one hundred sixty-one 
— a crop of sixteen years. Everyone of this number is still among the living 
somewhere in this country. They have entered all sorts of professions, from 
farmers to professors — all doing honor to the institution that gave them a 
start in life (for none are in prison and none have become a public charge). 

That the Alumni of the Berne schools are not a sleepy lot is evident from 
the fact that out of the foregoing number twenty have thus far obtained A. B. 
degrees from various colleges, five have taken doctor's degrees, seventy-six 
or more have attended or are attending college and at least thirty have already 
been married. Who could call this a wicked record? 

All the members of the Alumni are, of course, still mere girls and boys — 
not old enough to hold "real" responsible positions ; not young enough to be 
guilty of small misdemeanors, but just old enough to dig and dig hard^ to 
make good in everything they undertake. By and by the days will come when 
the burdens of life, which have made so matiy stoop-shouldered and to which 
the stoop-shouldered cling by force of habit, will be unloaded on new shoul- 
ders as every Alumnus was told long year? ago when he sat in the tiny pri- 
mary desk. 

Likewise every Alumnus was told in those happy days that it pays both 
financially and mentally to go on through high school. Whether the former 
still looks as attractive an inducement is a matter of individual experience, 
but that the latter is anything but a sham is evident from the fact that the 
high school fever is steadily increasing every year. Past graduates' records 
induce more to follow the same course. It seems that the prediction, made by 
"Benny" Winans years ago, namely that in twenty years from now every 
person who didn't have a high school training would be as far behind the 
times as a man who cannot write his own name now is behind the times, 
has impressed not a few as being very nearly the truth. 

The past record of the Berne school is a good one, but it is not so good 
that it cannot be made still better. The school is not so large that it cannot 
be made still larger; the enthusiasm of the Alumni association is not so great 
that more would be dangerous : the interest in the coming generations of the 
high school is not so great that every prospect has felt its presence ; the rela- 
tion between pupil and teacher is not so ideal that it cannot be made more 
ideal ; the calibre of the work done is not yet of so high a standard that it 
cannot be raised to a still higher plane. 

The past connections of every Alumnus with the Berne high school 
makes him take an extraordinary interest in the school. He hopes to see it 
grow larger and stronger and healthier as it increases in age. 

In the following pages appear the faces of every graduate prior to this 
year. Without doubt this collection will be a valuable asset of every Alum- 
nus with a bit of red blood in his veins. 
56 




OFFICERS 

ASA SPRUNGER 
ENOS D. LEHMAN 
ALDA SPRUNGER 
CLIFTON H. SPRUNGER 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

HULDA GILLIOM MARTHA BAUMGARTNER 

CARL T. HABEGGER 




Alumni Gallery 




CLASS— 1>^| 





CLASS— 190. 



CLASS— 1903 



9 0.9 




CLASS— 1904 

58 




CLASS— 1905 




CLASS— 1906 




CLASS— 1907 
59 




CLASS— 1909 




CLASS— 19in 



BBBDBBBB 



CLASS— 1911 



f0WWMtwmm 



CLASS— 1912 
60 




CLASS— 1913 




CLASS— 1914 







:afc::>;fi^:^:'fc^.:A^ 



CLASS— 1915 
61 



Names of Graduates by Years 

CLASS— 1901 
B. A. Winans, Supt. 

Martha Schug Amanda Soldner 

CLASS— 1902 
B. A. Winans, Supt. 

Nora Smith Ada Wittwer 

CLASS— 1903 
B. A. Winans, Supt. 

Wilda Gottschalk Salome Schug 

Cora Hocker Rose Lehman 

CLASS— 1904 
B. A. Winans, Supt. 

Albert Soldner Oswald Sprunger 

G. Adolph Lehman Asa Sprunger 

CLASS— 1905 

B. A. Winans, Supt. R. J. D. Waiters, Prin. 

Flora Neaderhouser Eva Erhart Thella Broughton 

Laura Bixler Floyd Ayres Caroline Hirschy 

Robert Sprunger Cora Schug 

CLASS— 1906 
B. A. Winans, Supt. Walters and Brentlinger, Prin. 

Inda Sprunger Herbert Lachot 

Bertha Wheeler Clara Schug 

CLASS— 1907 
Kenneth B. Kizer, Supt. John Weldy, Prin. 

Emma Bixler Tillman Soldner George Wittwer 

Clayton Smith Noah GiUiom Bessie Sprunger 

CLASS— 1909 

F. D. Huff, Supt. 

Orville Brim, Prin. Vera Van Buskirk, Vice- Prin. 

Earl Shaefer Albert Winteregg Henry Egly 

Gertrude Lehman Clinton Lehman 

CLASS— 1910 

F. D. Huff, Supt. 

Frieda Plack, Prin. G. A. Lehman, Vice- Prin. 

Martha Burkhalter Carl Habegger Mae Hocker 

Dora Hirschy Minnie Sprunger Orva Smith 

Wildas Soldner Carl Sprunger Martha Baumgartner 

Dorcas Sprunger Hugo Beitler Rufus von Gunten 

Jessie Stauffer Mae StautTer 

CLASS— 1911 

Mr. Huff, Supt. 

Instructors — Misses Beck, van der Smissen, Burke, Zeigler 

Wesley Sprunger Osie Beitler Frieda Sprunger 

Enos D. Lehman Alice Rinaker Wilbur Lehman 

Hilda Reusser Hulda Gilliom Grover Sprunger 

Kathryn Egly Eva Sprunger Ellis Sprunger 

Andrew Neuenschwander 
62 



CLASS— 1912 
Mr. Huff, Supt. Miss Beck, Prin. 

Instructors — Mr. Millikan, Miss Lehman 



Adina Gilliom 
Alfred Habegger 
Grover Soldner 
Barbara Hirschy 
Clifton Sprunger 
Christina Habegger 
Lydia Sprunger 

Herman E 



Ernest Stengel 
Jesse Habegger 
Esther Bixler 
Clifton Striker 
Gertrude Hirschy 
True Gottschalk 
Clarence Lehman 



Ezra Wanner 
Martin Sprunger 
Arman Hirschy 
Edna Sprunger 
Fanny Schindler 
Victor Eichenberger 
Mary Burkhalter 



aumgartner 



Elma Sprunger 



CLASS— 1913 

Mr. Huff, Supt. Miss Beck, Prin. 

Instructors — Mr. Kleuh, Miss Lehman 



Frieda Lehman 
Leslie Baumgartner 
Anna Hofstetter 
David Depp 
Melvin Hirschy 



Rena Sprunger 
Vilas Schindler 
Harry Sprunger 
Ella Sprunger 
Walter Hirschy 
Mary Ann Sprunger 



Loretta Lehman 
Reuben Liechty 
Arthur Wittwer 
Hilda Lehman 
Noah Burkhalter 



CLASS— 1914 

Mr. Huff, Supt. Miss Beck, Prin. 

Instructors — Mr. Records, Miss Smith, Miss Grimm 



Clellah Brickley 
Cora Beitler 
Bernice Ray 
Elden Sprunger 
Elma Neaderhouser 
Louise Habegger 



Metta Habegger 
Elfrieda Franz 
Elizabeth Lehman 
Lulu Kerr 
Roy Girod 
Ella Welty 



Edward Eichenberger 
Selma Neuenschwander 
Waldo Lehman 
Alda Sprunger 
Esther Habegger 
Josephine Sauders 



CLASS— 1915 
Mr. Huff, Supt. Miss Beck, Prin. 

Instructors — Mr. Sprunger, Miss Prange 



Gertrude Lehman 
Edna Neaderhous 
Vera Braun 
Martha Lehman 
Everett Schug 
Elda Sprunger 



Alice Lehman 
Milton Sprunger 
Horace Caffee 
Ova Wechter 
Noah Soldner 
Naomi Haecker 



Ruth Kattmann 



Elr 



Cleo Rumple 
Ella Habegger 
Frieda Maurer 
Ruth Reusser 
Arthur Sprunger 
Paul Rohrer 
Luginbill 



CLASS— 1916 

Mr. Huff, Supt. Miss Beck, Prin. 

Instructors — Mr. Spnmger, Miss Prange, Miss Baumgartner 

Irene Stuckey Alwin van der Smissen Joe Habegge 

Cordelia Riesen Edna Neuenschwander 

Frances Reusser Mabel Hirschy 

Lorena Sprunger Florence Lehman 

Lester Smith Ermin Bixler 

David Bixler Rufus Blowers 

Sybilla Sprunger Clarence Hirschy 

Pearl Atz 

63 



Leona Sprunger 
Charlotte Stengel 
Raymond Wulliman 
lima Baumgartner 
Daniel Teeter 
Clinton Soldner 




DANIEL WINTEREGG 



OUR JANITOR 
who has served faithfully for fourteen years. 




MRS M\R\ B\lMi.\Rr\ER 
Primary Teacher of the Berne Scliools for Twenty-two Years. 



64 



EXCHANGES 



The "Budget" thanks all the schools who have been sending their papers 
and for the comments made. The following are the names of all the papers 
which we have exchanged with during the past year: 



The Almanac, Lake Forest, 111. 
The Advocate. Lincoln, Nebraska. 
The Artisan, Bridgeport, Conn. 
The Anvil, Painesville, Ohio. 
The Bumble Bee, Charlotteville, Va 
The Booster, La Crosse, Wis. 
The Beacon. Detroit, Michigan. 
Caldron, Fort ^^'a^•ne, Lnd. 



Cynosure, Fargo, N. Dakota. 
The Carthaginian, Carthage, S. Dak 
The Clarion, West Hartford, Conn. 
The Cynosure, Richmond, Lid. 
The Daleville Leader, Daleville, Va, 
The Daisy Chain, '\\'aco, Texas. 
The Echo, Central Catholic H. S., 

Ft. A\'ayne, Lid. 
The Echo, Upland, Lidiana. 
Earlham Press. Richmond, Lid. 
Frog, Bay City, Texas. 
Goshen College Record, Goshen 
The Gleaner, Pawtucket, R. L 
The Habit, Salina, Kansas, 
'^he Humboldt Life, St. Paul, ]\Lnn 
The Hilltop, Jersey City, N. J. 
The Hilltop, Warren, Mass. 
The Herald, Spencerville, Lid. 
The Hi-Crier, Niles, Ohio. 
Headlight. Richmond, Lid. 
The Lidiana Dail}- Student, Bloom 

ington. Lid. 
The Item, Pasadena, Cal. 
The Ingot, Hancock, ]Mich. 
The Insight, Hartford City, Lid. 
Kilikilik, Tiffin, Ohio. 
Keramos, East Liverpool, Ohio. 
Lasell Leaves. Boston, Mass. 
Libertonian, Liberty, Indiana. 
M. H. Aerolith. Plymouth, Wis. 
The Mirror, Lima. Ohio. 



The Mirror, Mondovi, Wis. 

The Missile, Petersburg, Virginia. 

The Messenger. Durham, N. C. 

The ^Missouri H. S., Columbia, Mo. 

The Monroe H. S., Monroe, Mich. 

Opinion, Peoria, Illinois. 

The Owl, Middletown, New York. 

The Oracle, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Orange and Green, Macon, Georgia. 

Pebbles, Marshalltown, Iowa. 

Pilgrim, Plymouth, Indiana. 

Pasco School News, Dade City, Fla. 

The Post, Portland, Oregon. 

Palmetto and Pine, St. Petersburg, Fla. 
i.. The Pennant, Elkhart, Lidiana. 

Purple and Gold, Osceola, Kansas. 

Revelings, Decatur, Indiana. 

The Record, Staunton, Virginia. 

Rensselaer Polytechnic Times, Troy. 
Lid. New York. 

The Searchlight, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

The Somerset Idea, Somerset, Ky. 

The Searchlight, Portland, Ind. 

The Skirmisher, Hillsdale, Mich. 

The Student, Portsmouth, Virginia. 

Spectator, Johnstown, Pa. 

Southwest Standard, Springfield, Mo. 

The Signal Butte, Miles City, Mont. 

The Spokesman, Plant City, Fla. 

The Shamokin H. S. Review, Sha- 
mokin. Pa. 

Stampede, Havre. Mont. 

Tiptonian, Tipton, Indiana. 

The ^^'ashingtonian, Machias, Me. 

The ^^'itmarsum, Blufifton, Ohio. 

The Wheat, Ritzville, Washington. 

X-Ray, Anderson, Indiana. 

X-Ray, Marion, Virgina. 



65 




THE BUDGET STAFF WISHES TO 
THANK THE BUSINESS MEN OF 
THE CITY FOR THE SUPPORT 
GIVEN US DURING THE PAST 
YEARS. WE INTEND TO REPAY 
YOU FOR YOUR KINDNESS IF 
WE HAVE NOT DONE SO UP TO 
THIS TIME. 





"Take the Advice of Experts" 

YOU probably haven't much expert knowledge about the clothes 
you buy; you deal with the obvious superficial facts — fit, style, 
price. FJut the "insides" — the part you can't see or feel — -are the 
important parts. 

Take the advice of experts — we know the makers who put the 
best underlying values into clothes. American Art Custom Tailors 
are doing it better than it's ever been done in clothes-making. 

These makers guarantee fabrics, color, service and all. 
Don't let the dye situation bother you. 



THE MODEL 




Interior View 



of 



The Big Four Barber Shop 



W. B. LEHMAN, Prop. 



You know the rest. 



Bracker's Famous Ice Cream 



IS FROZEN IN BERNE 



BEST ON THE MARKET 



TRY IT ONCE AND YOU ARE CONVINCED 



For Shoe Repairing 

Leather or Neolin Soles — Sewed or Tacked. 

Also Shoe Polish— Black, Tan, White, Ox-blood. 
Call on J. F. MAZELIN for prompt service. 



The Star Grocery 

Dealers in 

CONFFXTIONERY, STAPLE AND FANCY 

GROCERIES 

We guarantee every article sold. 

R. E. LIECHTY, Prop. 



JiMiNiTy 




BERNE 

HARDWARE 

COMPANY 



NIGHT CALLS ATTENDED TO PROMPTLY 
Phones— Office, 224; E. C. Bierie, 188; L. L. Yager, 252. 



BIERIE & YAGER 

UNDERTAKERS AND EMBALMERS 

PORCH SWINGS — LAWN CHAIRS — RUGS 
AND LINOLEUM 

IT IS QUALITY WITH US — U PAY LESS HERE 
Berne, Indiana 



THE CONKLIN SELF-FILLING FOUNTAIN PEN 

Fills and cleans itself in four seconds — Will not leak or "sweat" — Al- 
ways writes at the first stroke — Ink-flow is uniform and steady — Pen 
action is smooth and easy — Has nothing to get out of order — Won't roll 
off the desk. 

The CONKLIN is not only the original, but it has been on the 
market for 16 consecutive years, and is toda}' endorsed by over 1,000,000 
satisfied users. That's REAL PROOF! 

THE BOOK STORE 



THE FAIR 



stands for EFFICIENCY, 

ECONOMY and GOOD WILL. 



THE FAIR 



' 




Berne Grain & Hay Co. 


GRAIN 




COAL 


SEEDS 




FLOUR 


HAY 


^l^^SHHPfi 


FEED 


STRAW- 


IWiBWyjW^BBiiss^ 


SALT 


SEWERS 


M^mmUM^^^ 


CEMENT 




BERNE, INDIANA 




Phone No. 26 


STENGEL & CRAIG DRUG CO. j 


Druggists j 


Dealers in j 


WALL PAPER. PAINTS AND OIL 


A. D. S., REXALL and CHINAMEL Agents. 


YOURS FOR SERVICE 




HOME OF THE BERNE MFG. CO. 
Makers of the Famous "WINNER" OVERALLS 

Buy and wear the "WINNER"' and be a Winner. 

BERNE MFG. CO. 



THE BERNE MEAT MARKET 

Dealers in 
All kinds of Fancy and Smoked Meats. 



DAVID BIXLER 
Jeweler and Optometrist 

Eyes tested and Lenses accurately fitted regardless of age. 
Any lens can he duplicated regardless of where it was made. 
Fine line of Watches, Clocks, Jewelry, Diamonds, Kodaks, etc. 
Equipped to repair fine Watches. 



At the Close of the School Year 

Wishing You All Success, 

Health and Happiness. 

Very Sincerely, 

T. H. SOLDNER, D.D.S. 



Sprunger & Gerber 

for 

PHOTOGRAPHIC WORK OF EVERY 

DESCRIPTION 

FRAMING AND ENLARGING ARTISTICALLY 
DONE 

Phone, 135 



+._.. 




/A UNSING/ 

YY ^^^^\f^ Those who are hard to fit, 

Those who are hard to please, 
Those who like fine quality, 
Those who seek real economy, 
Buy the 

,FOR Summer 

Comfort Munsing Wear 

'SPRUNGER, LEHMAN & CO. 



Say, Listen! 

Don't put off ordering that Suit 
Until the last minute. 

You don't save anything by waiting. 
In fact, you lose. 

You get less wear dinging the season than the fel- 
low who buys early. 

Drop in as you are going by and see the four 
hundred patterns we have to show you of our 
made-to-order suits. 

Prices, $12.00 to $35.00 
THE PEOPLE'S STORE 



W'e wish to thank the Class of 1916 for the busi- 
ness courtesies extended us dtunng the year. 

We hereby extend our best wishes to each member 
of the class. 

As you step out on the threshold of life, we trust 
each one of you will be successful in the vocations you 
pursue. 

Here's to your success, 
SAUDER-SMITH COMPANY 



Be a Home Booster and use 

Jewel Flour 

It's made in BERNE 

Berne Milling Co. 



Send^ChildreR 




Many of the shoppers who visit us daily are bright little school 
ildren and they are shrewd buyers— most of them— in their way. 
They are always welcome here — Send the children. 

CENTRAL GROCERY 

OR\^\ SMITH, Prop. 



WE LIKE TO HAVE PEOPLE SAY 

Can you clean, press and repair ray suit in a hurry? 

EMERGENCY CALLS PLEASE US 

We can and give you service that's 
worth while. 

Even in haste we are painstaking and 
thorough. 

Call us any time — we'll answer. 

ORVAL ALLSPAW 



ANDREW GOTTSCHALK, P.ERNE, INDL\NA 

Dealer in 

Drugs, Medicines, Chemicals, Patent Medicines, 

Soaps, Combs, Brushes, Perfumery, Fancy and Toilet Articles, 

and all goods usually sold by druggists. 

All goods selected with care and v/arranted as represented. 



MUNCIE NATIONAL INSTITUTE 

SPRING AND SUMMER SESSIONS will be the biggest and 
best in the school's history. 

New departments have been added and other departments have 
been strengthened. A school where you can be accommodated with 
the work desired. 

TEACHERS' COURSES COLLEGE COURSES 

VOCATIONAL COURSES 
Special attention is given to the various Teachers' Courses and 
the Supervisors' Courses in Home Economics, Industrial Arts, Agri- 
culture, Fine and Applied Art and Music. 

Unusually helpful courses in Oratory, Law, Bookkeeping, Sales- 
manship, Shorthand, Typewriting and Physical Culture are offered. 
MID-SPRING TERM OPENS APRIL 24th. 
SUMMER TERM OPENS JUNE 5th. 
MID-SUMMER SHORT TERM OPENS JULY 17th. 
FALL TERM OPENS SEPTEMBER 18th. 
For Catalog and Special Bulletins address: 
M. D. KELLY, President or H. M, JOHNSTON, Registrar. 

FRANK M. LIFE, Dean. 
MUNCIE NATIONAL INSTITUTE MUNCIE, INDIANA 



Why do we advise dentrifice users to 
throw back the head when brushing the 
teeth? 

Because, as everyone can see by using the hand-mirror, the 
throat and tonsils are thus subjected to the disinfecting ac- 
tion of the cream. 

Epidemic afifections, characterized by catarrhal inflam- 
mation of the mucous membrane of the nose and throat, 
purulent discharges and nervous disorders are greatly di- 
minished and generally avoided by diligently "toileting" 
the mouth. 

Yours for consultation, 

H. W. NEUENSCHWANDER, D.D.S. 



^^98 ,g,6 I 



CONGRATULATIONS AND BEST WISHES 

from the 

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COLLEGE 

Fort Wayne, Indiana 

The largest school of its kind in the Central States, and 
The finest school of its kind in the United States. 

"THERE'S A REASON" 



(137 young men and young women, graduates of 
The International, placed in positions during the 
ten weeks, ending April 29, 1916, and then only a 
comparatively small per cent, of the calls received 
were filled.) 

We will occupy our new quarters in the NEW 
RIEGEL BUILDING within a very few weeks. 



Fall Opening— Monday, Sept. 4, 1916. 
CATALOG FREE 



The Tilo-Silo 

was designed by prac- 
tical farmers to supply 
the demand for a per- 
fect Hollow Tile Silo at 
a moderate cost. 

Write us for prices of 
this popular silo, manu- 
factured by 

THE TILO-SILO CO. 
Berne, Ind. 




I AM THE GREATEST THING IN THE WORLD 

I am the friend of the friendless. 

I am the Apostle of Sunshine when days are dark. 

I am for the widows and the fatherless, and am the sole support of 
millions of them. 

I buy the home, clothe the family and spread the table. 

I pay oft the mortgage. 

I educate the sons and daughters. 

I am the only sinking fund that will provide a certain sum at the 
uncertain time of death. 

I support millions of old men who trusted me in their youth, and 
deposited some of their savings with me. 

I free the business world from the death risk that menaces its credits 
and future plans. 

I am the bitterest enemy of worry, misery, want and trouble ; I re- 
place them with cheer, joy and contentment. 

I am the strongest financial institution on earth. 

I am The Lincoln Life Insurance. 

O. F. GILLIOM, Distr. Mgr. 



There are Two Reasons Why Stafford 
Engravings are used in this Annual 
and why they should be used in Yours 



The first of course, is quality. Through years of specialization 
our organization has become unusually expert in half-tones, color 
plates, zinc-etchings, and designs for college and school publications. 
We have the very best shop equipment and every facility for prompt 
production of quality work. 

The famous Levy Acid Blast process gives our half-tones a cleaner, 
deeper, sharper etching than the tub method most commonly used, 
and makes it easier for your printer to give you a first-class job. 



The second is Stafford Co-operation. For the benefit of our cus- 
tomers in their dealing v^^ith us, we have prepared a valuable hand- 
book entitled "Engraving for College and School Publications," con- 
taining 164 pages and over 300 illustrations, and giving complete in- 
formation in regard to planning your publication, the preparation of 
copy, and ordering of engravings. This book simplifies ordering, 
prevents costly mistakes, and means high quality engravings at lowest 
cost. We do not sell it — but we lend a copy to the staff of each pub- 
lication for which we make the engravings. 



Let Staitord make your commencement invitations, fraternity 
stationery, visiting cards, and any other copper-plate engraving or 
steel die embossing. We have a large department devoted exclusively 
to this class of work, and can give you both quality and service. — 
Samples with prices on request. 



STAFFORD ENGRAVING COMPANY 

ARTISTS :: DESIGNERS :: ENGRA\'ERS 
CENTURY BLDG.. INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 



Amos Hirschy 

For 

INSURANCE AND REAL ESTATE 

and all kinds of 

NOTARY WORK 

Office on first floor of The Bank of Berne Bldg. 



Baumgartner Bros. & Co. 

Represent 

BERNE'S RELIABLE HARDWARE STORE 

Investigate 



NOW AND ALWAYS 

A pleasing variety of Candy — 
A large assortment to select from, 
at the 
FIVE AND TEN-CENT STORE 



E 

EAT 

T 



Amos Schindler 

FOR ARTISTIC PICTURE FRAMING 

And first-class 

CABINET WORK 

Work guaranteed to please. 



Improve Your Appearance with a 

HAIR-CUT. SHAVE, MASSAGE 

and, if necessary, 

DE LONEY'S HAIR. SCALP AND SKIN TONIC 

At the Old Stand 

FOREMAN & RAWLEY 



You are sure of Quality and Style if your new 

MILLINERY 

was bought from 

OSIE BEITLER 



GOSHEN COLLEGE 

Departments : 

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS— NORMAL SCHOOL 

ACADEMY— SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS— SCHOOL OF BIBLE 

SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 

SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 

THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS— 

Courses leading to A. B. and B. S. degrees. 

THE NORMAL SCHOOL— 

(Accredited) — Prepares "A" and "B" class teachers for all grades of public 
school teaching. 

THE ACADEMY— 

Complete High School and College preparatory courses with wide range 
of electives. 

THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC— 

Complete courses in vocal and instrumental music. Sacred music given 
special attention. 

THE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS— 

Practical courses in Bookkeeping and Stenography. Bookkeeping courses 
given in connection with courses in Agriculture and Domestic Science. 
Our graduates hold good positions. 

THE SCHOOL OF BIBLE AND MISSIONS— 

Practical courses for Ministers. Missionaries and Sunday School Workers. 
Tuition free to those taking regular courses. 

THE SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS— 

Complete and well equipped laboratories. Full courses in Academy or 
College Departments. Students may major in this school and take B. S. 
degree. 

THE SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE— 

Full courses arranged to accommodate any student from common school 
to college, leading to B. S. degree. Also two full years of Science, leading 
to Advanced Agriculture. 140-acre farm for experimental and observa- 
tional work within ten minutes' walk from College. Good stock and good 
machinery. 

NOTE — Two years of Collegiate work leading to Medicine and Engineering. 

EQUIPMENT— 

Twenty-one well trained Christian teachers, holding degrees from best 
American universities. Large, well equipped laboratories, lecture rooms 
and library. Science hall completed at cost of nearly $50,000, equipped 
with modern agricultural, dairy and butter-making machinery. 

EXPENSES— 

Tuition— $15.00 to $18.00 per term. Board— $28.50 per term. Room— $10.00 
to $12.00 per term. (Including laundry free of charge.) 
Summer Term opens — June 5th. — Fall Term opens — Sept. 20th. 

Winter Term opens — Dec. 13th. — Spring Term opens — March 19th. 

Summer Term opens — June 11th (1917). 

WRITE FOR CATALOG AND FURTHER INFORMATION 

JOHN ELLSWORTH HARTZLER. President. GOSHEN, INDIANA 



"Gambling is an Express Train 
to Ruin." 



And the average person shuns the vice as 
he would a reptile. Yet, scores of people 
are unconsciously gambling with their fu- 
ture happiness by spending all their earn- 
ings and not providing for a rainy day. To 
make a sure thing of your future comfort 
and success, why not start a savings account 
with this Bank and add to it a portion of 
your earnings from time to time. 
Do it now, for tomorrow mav be too late. 



PEOPLE'S STATE BANK 

RUDOLPH SCHUG, Cashier 



EDISON'S NEW INVENTION 



We are licensed to demonstrate 



2^ NEW EDISON 




The Expenditure is 

More than Two Million Dollars 

in Experiments Done. 

EDISON ACTUALLY 
RE-CREATES 
ALL FORMS OF MUSIC 

We want you to hear this won- 
derful new invention — the great- 
est musical instrument in the 
world. 



THE PIANO THAT CAN BE PLAYED BY THE 
WHOLE FAMILY 



. Some people have not much 
music in their head but ha^■e 
a lot of it in their feet. For 
proof of this statement notice 
their movements when they 
hear good music. So get an 
instrument that c.in be played 
with vour feet. 




W. J. SPRUN GE R 



ARE YOU GETTING A 

SHARE OF OUR 

"MELON"? 



Twice a year — January ist and July ist — 
we "cut a melon" and every dollar in our 
Savings Department gets a part of it. 

ARE YOU IN? 
If not, get in now and share in the next dis- 
tribution. 



The Bank of Berne 



"Well Pleased" 
"Excellent Work" 
"Better Than Expected' 



THAT'S WHAT OUR CUSTOMERS SAY 
ABOUT OUR PRINTING AND BINDING 



Send those valuable old books our way — we'll 
rebind them so that they'll "look like new". 

Send your print job our way — we'll put out an 
artistic piece of work for you. 



BERNE WITNESS COMPANY 

The House of Good Printing and Binding. 



PEOPLE'S LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 
Frankfort, Indiana 

An Old Line Legal Reserve Compan}^ 
PHILIP SCHUG & SON, Agts. 

Office over People's State Bank 



HECKMAN |±J 
BINDERY INC. \S\ 




OCT 96 

.„....,... N^ MANCHESTER.